Public Announcements

 

A Centennial Commemoration: Historical Contributions of African American Psychologists from Arkansas

The Arkansas Association of Black Psychology Professionals, in collaboration with the Diversity Committee of the Arkansas Psychological Association, commemorates 100 years of historical contributions of African American Psychologists from Arkansas.  The featured speaker will be Dr. Terrence Roberts, Clinical Psychologist and a member of the Little Rock Nine, and the special honoree will be Little Rock Nine Member Minnijean Brown Trickey.

This commemoration will highlight the 100th year anniversary of the first African American to receive a doctorate in psychology, Francis Cecil Sumner, born in Pine Bluff, Arkansas.  His doctorate in psychology was conferred in 1920 at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Download the full brochure, with speaker details, here.

Arkansas has an extensive history of transformative contributions of African American psychologists from Arkansas in the fields of psychology, education and social justice. The forum will trace this history from 1920 to 2020.  Other African American psychologists from Arkansas to be featured will include: the late Dr. Mamie Phipps Clark (Hot Springs), principal investigator of the “Doll Study” which formed the basis for the U.S. Supreme Court decision -  Brown v. Board of Education;  Dr. Robert L. Williams (Little Rock), a graduate of Philander Smith College, professor emeritus at Washington University St Louis; the late Dr. William Sterling Hall (Lonoke), past chairman of the Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park. Additionally, the forum will recognize the first PhD African American psychology graduates from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville as well as highlight the contributions by Arkansas HBCUs in preparing and training African Americans to become psychologists.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

  • Review the historical contributions of African American psychologists from Arkansas who made transformative changes in America
  • Collect oral narratives of black psychologists from Arkansas during the early years of psychology
  • Present narratives from the first generation of black psychologists to receive doctoral degrees from the University of Arkansas
  • Review the significance of diversity and inclusion within the field of psychology